Resurrect Your Purpose, Passion and Possibility Thinking

July 23, 2010

Create Job Opportunities in Your Life – Right Now

The news of legions of jobless Americans strikes fear in even the strongest and bravest of us. No matter what your occupation, or strata of earning power, you, your family members,  peers, or associates might find yourselves losing a livelihood, a routine, and even an identity, as you dive into the most uncomfortable and demanding “job” of all: looking for work.

Joblessness is a condition that brings home to roost many of our own personal shortcomings, and let’s be honest: our human-ness often brings with it an aversion to seeing our job loss as a reflection of something within us; we often rationalize the event by describing it as the result of another’s behavior and attitude towards us. But, if you lose your job, as much as you would like to make it someone else’s problem, you can’t. It’s all yours.

The cold, hard reality of job search is this: it’s time to take a good look at your own “stuff,” what you bring to the table, and whether or not you need to press your own metaphorical “reset” button before you hit the pavement. Could it possibly be that in your most recent job tenure you let a few things “go,” like your attitude, your interest, your enthusiasm, your creativity, your potential? There’s that reset button.  Honest self-examination, soul-searching assessments of your skills and talents, and an attitude check and tune-up are absolutely in order.

The GOOD NEWS is there ARE JOBS out there. Seriously, there are!! If you will take an honest inventory of your interpersonal skills, your personal commitment to excellence, and the level of energy you apply to each day of your search, you will take “step one” toward finding another job that is just right for you. It doesn’t matter who you are, or what your job titles have been, or what industry has employed you in the past. If you are a recent graduate, it really doesn’t matter what degree you have earned. There are still jobs out there, and new opportunities continue to arise each day. I challenge you to tweak your perspective, put on your “game face,” and resurrect your passion for life.

Let me tell you a story about a radio interview that I conducted that truly re-charged my own career resolve. I had the pleasure of interviewing Mac Anderson, Founder and CEO of Simple Truths Publishing, and Loren Shook, Founder, President, and CEO of Silverado Senior Living, on BetterTimesAfterFifty. com, an Internet radio show that is broadcast on AdviceRadio.com.

I asked the two men a number of questions about how and why they created their businesses; how Simple Truths evolved so swiftly into global success; and how Silverado grew from one Alzheimer’s residential facility to a company with 2200 employees in four states. Their companies continue to grow and prosper even now, during a time of unbelievable economic turmoil. Their responses to my questions resounded with enthusiasm, exuberance and, yes, unmitigated happiness with how living their dreams had created such potential to touch the lives of so many, customers and employees alike. Every question I asked, they each, in turn, answered robustly:

— “At Simple Truths, we bring positive ideas to life,

and reinforce core values.”

— “At Silverado Senior Living, we look forward to coming to work,

because we get to change people’s lives.”

— “Our goal at Simple Truths is to serve our customers

and serve each other.”

— “We touch the spirit of each and every person

we serve at Silverado Senior Living.”

— “I love what I do. I’m thankful each day that I can make a positive difference

in people’s lives at Simple Truths.”

— “At Silverado, we’re all about the passion and purpose

of giving life to those we serve, and to those who work here as well.”

My co-host Steve Mason and I, along with the show engineer, couldn’t help but feel the energy lift the roof off the studio during that 30 minute segment. “Wow,” Steve looked up at me over his microphone, “At a time like this, when so many are doing so badly, this is amazing!” The two of us felt like any bad news that was being reported that day by media throughout the world wasn’t going to puncture our bubble. Our own interview had given us a double shot of positivity!

Back in my office later that day, I processed my own “on-air” performance review by listening to the show several times in succession. I listened carefully to my guests, and “the feel” of the repartee that is captured by the recording. The two men offered more enthusiasm for their work, and sense of purpose about their companies in 30 minutes, than most of us ever express during 40 years of professional servitude.

I was struck with an “Ah-ha!” moment. Both Loren and Mac employ people like you, like me, like many people you know. The wisdom in their words tells me that there are other employers out there who ARE ACTUALLY HIRING PEOPLE right now. And guess what? They’re looking for people who can still see a vision of passion, purpose, and potential in their work and their lives. They are looking for people who can bring energy and enthusiasm to the job.

Julie LaCroix, M.A. Ed., CMP, Career Management Consultant and Coach for Power Connections Inc., gives this perspective on getting in touch with your passions during your hunt for a job:

“Perhaps it’s not the right time for a career change, but it’s always the right time to think about what drives you. Being intrinsical

ly driven at work lies somewhere between your abilities and interests, with a formidable paycheck sprinkled on top.” Julie asks each of us to truly think about what our unique interests are, and explains that whatever drives us has an underlying interest that represents itself in our actions.

“Are you interested in music and don’t see how that relates to being an accountant, for example?” she asks. “Those two things are very unlikely matches to one another. Perhaps the correlation for you is in the teams. If you enjoy playing music in a band, then you most likely prefer to work as part of a financial team with shared goals. It’s actually the power of the team that drives you.”

Once you know what drives you, according to Ms. LaCroix, you will be more in touch with your passion and deliver even greater results.

Now, that’s something to bring to the table during your job hunt.

Di Chapman, Founder and President of Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service;  and Chief Communications Officer, Power Connections. www.dichapman.com / www.powerconnectionsinc.com

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The Energy Formula for Success

July 13, 2010

“Passion + Purpose = Potential2

Look closely at yourself in the mirror. Are you the kind of person employers are looking for?

I have the distinct privilege of being able to interview talented and oftentimes amazing people as a lifestyle reporter and guest host for the Internet radio show “Better Times After Fifty.” An underlying theme in my interviews reveals that every success story I hear on the air shares some very important characteristics with the others. Successful people know what they love to do; they know what they love to offer their customers, employers, and employees; and they know how important it is to fulfill their missions of helping people change their lives for the better. They’re crystal clear about this. Their passion and purpose exponentially created, and affects, their success. I don’t think it’s coincidental.

What is it that comes together in sync for the success stories of the world? I believe it’s passion and purpose that channels the energy of success, and the result can be an exponential burst of potential. As you seek a new job, it may be time to press your own reset button to resurrect a fire in your belly, to muster your enthusiasm and desire to radiate the knowledge, talent, and capability you can invest in a future employer. Perhaps a snippet from my own life can be an inspiration and help to yours.

When my inspirational quotation teddy bear business was featured in the Simple Truths’ book Customer Love, it was an amazing affirmation of my commitment to bringing my “best self” to every transaction. Throughout lean times and great times, I have always insisted on living with the energy of passion, purpose, and potential. Many of you, too, have given your all to careers where you performed at peak capacity 40, 50, and 60-plus hours a week, year after year. It wasn’t always easy to put on a game face and charge into work with all cylinders firing. But, you did it, and by doing your best to contribute to the success of your past employers, you sowed a portfolio of talents that you can offer another one going forward.

My inclusion in Customer Love motivated me to study the book and read all of the stories related within it. I’m glad I did. The “lessons” and principles portrayed in Customer Love will raise your energy for living every day, for every interaction you have as you look for work, and most certainly for every job interview. Customer Love could literally be a guidebook for anyone who wishes to “knock the socks off” of a potential employer. Even if you don’t think your job is one that actually serves “customers,” reinventing your own perspective to one of a “customer service” mentality will drive up your energy level, enthusiasm, and ultimate success at finding a job. These characteristics are what employers look for as they sift through a line of job applicants.

If you’re struggling with the “Why me?” question that often follows a job loss, another book that can hold pearls of wisdom for you is Betty Mahalik’s Living a Five Star Life. I found two helpful nuggets in Betty’s book. “We often make our experiences harder than they have to be by our resistance to change, growth or stress,” she says, “…use stress to take you a step closer to …what you want to become.” Later in the book, she quotes an unknown source who said, “Sometimes struggles are exactly what we need in our life. If we were to go through life without any obstacles, we would be crippled.” Perhaps loss of a job can be an unexpected transition to living a better life.

Your job hunt is all about improving YOU. Stay receptive to the possibilities of finding work in new arenas, or learn to look at the same old job in a new light and with new eyes. Make a promise to yourself that you will bring your best to every interview, every phone call, and every opportunity to connect with others.

Stay energetic, stay passionate, and stay confident.

Commend yourself for the achievements you have attained in life thus far, and define your goals and the value you will bring to your next job. Muster up the fire in your belly. As Emerson once said, “The world makes way for the man who knows where he is going.” Even if the man is job-hunting!

Finally, take a tip from Susan Howington, CEO of Power Connections, Inc.  Susan assists executives who are “in transition” after being laid off. She sees job offers coming in to her clients who have polished their appearance, defined their value propositions, and practiced the steps of improving their energy level. “The jobs are out there for energetic applicants,” says Howington. “When clients approach potential companies with an enthusiastic ‘What can I do for you?’ attitude, good things happen. They’re absolutely getting jobs!”

Di Chapman is the Founder and President of Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service; and the Chief Communications Officer of Power Connections Inc. www.dichapman.com

www.powerconnectionsinc.com

Resolve to be a “Contributer” to Life

June 8, 2010

Lessons Learned in the Presence of Greatness

“Someone out there needs you more than you need them!” – Lt. General Hal Moore

It’s February 15, 2010, President’s Day, and I’m shivering in a brutally cold whipping wind in Montevallo, Alabama. The skies are blue and the sunshine is beautiful, though, and there is an air of expectancy and anticipation that buoys my every step. “Thank goodness I’ve worked in outdoor conditions of all description,” I think to myself. “At least I’m thoroughly bundled up.” The reality is I’ve spent many a production day in sweltering 95 degree heat, with 50 to 60% humidity, trying to salvage a silk blouse and a hairdo. I’d take the cold any day!

I step inside to check on last minute details in my notes, and to make final phone calls; and stop to compliment two polite and lovely women who await the start of an eventful and unforgettable day. They are currently in a quiet hall, chatting softly, giving no hint as to the magnitude of the convocation that will start shortly, or to the growing crowd gathering at the end of the driveway, stepping into line as they exit their vehicles. I take it all in, literally savoring every second of the energy and expectation and excitement that whirls around me.

I can’t imagine being anywhere else at that moment in time, and am still in awe of how God and the universe say “yes” to heartfelt intentions, to a deeply rooted sense of purpose, and a determination to find a way to somehow contribute to the world, no matter how great or how little you are able to put forth. So, literally running from location to location on an outdoor campus with freezing wind at my back, I’m elated at the prospect of what is to come, and know that this will be a day I will never forget.

Like every unforgettable day in one’s life, there is a back story. And my particular story about that amazing day in Montevallo, Alabama is directly related to the gift of a book, and what the words within it meant to me. “In the Presence of Greatness ….” Mac Anderson writes in his forward to the Simple Truths book A Tender Warrior: 5 Leadership Letters To America, “I wasn’t prepared to be blown away by General Hal Moore’s kindness, humility, and his passion for life.”

You see, a year ago, in February 2009, I had the distinct privilege of meeting Mac Anderson in Scottsdale, Arizona. It was a follow-up to the inclusion of my story in his 2008 book Customer Love, and when I had the chance to speak to him on a “poster-perfect” day in the gorgeous Arizona desert, I was open to any inspiration and possibilities that a conversation with such an accomplished man could render. I was there with complete “heart, soul and intellect” at attention, and when he put an advance copy of A Tender Warrior in my hands, electricity went through me and sparked what I can only call “a knowing:” I was drawn to the General, and with each touch of the pages, I knew I had to somehow, some way, be in his presence.

So my story today is not just about how I traveled from sunny Southern California to unseasonably cold Alabama to be a part of an event that would honor Lt. General Hal Moore, and it turns out, the U.S. Army Chief of Staff General George W. Casey, Jr., as well. It’s a story about how deeply-rooted purpose gave me the courage to reach out again and again to someone I felt an enormous amount of respect, appreciation, and admiration for; and in so doing, found myself in the presence of greatness all around.

We ALL Have Something to Contribute to Life

I remember a day, many years ago, when I had the privilege to meet Alma Powell. “Young or old, you still have something to give to your country,” she said. Now that I’m squarely positioned in the “mature” segment of our population, I think a lot about the wisdom of this statement, and believe that it applies to life as well.

Who’s to say that a person of a “certain age” contributes less to our world than someone of youth and physical prowess? I plan on living at least another 50 years on this planet (I have to – I have way too many plans to check out earlier!!), and not in one mental image of myself down the road do I see a woman who is not giving back to my community, country, friends, family and earth. I will leave this world kicking and screaming if I don’t make a difference. And, honestly, part of the drive within me to do something significant comes from a huge recognition of the trails blazed and conquered by those who have come before me. My achievements are meant to be an acknowledgement of the debt I owe to those who created the life I have, and who did so in uncertain, difficult, and often deadly circumstances. Giving back is part of who I am.

So, when I was offered the chance to come to Montevallo, Alabama to honor General Hal Moore as he was appointed Distinguished National Honorary Chair of The American Citizenship Trust and its American Village Campus; and to see him present the American Freedom Award to his longtime friend General George W. Casey, Jr., and posthumously to General George W. Casey, Sr., a fire in my belly said, “Go!”

I did, and I didn’t look back. In anticipation of what I knew was going to be an amazing experience, in the midst of the events of the celebration weekend, which included the 88th birthday celebration of General Moore, as well as a 10th Anniversary celebration of the American Citizenship Trust, I opened myself up to meeting amazing people like Tom Walker, Founder and CEO of the American Citizenship Trust, and his wonderful, accomplished staff at the American Village.

I met the man called “Driver,” the author of A Tender Warrior, and his lovely and spirited wife Char. I had the pleasure of meeting Brian Sobel, of Sobel Communications, a specialist in military history and events, who has interviewed and written about General Moore for publication numerous times.

But, I cannot tell a lie. The event truly came alive for me the minute the beloved Vietnam War hero himself, Lt. General Hal Moore, walked into view, a handsome soldier with a huge, beautiful smile. When he passed by me in the processional, I knew I was right where I was meant to be that day. And when he delivered his prepared speech with strength and conviction and energy, nearly 600 of us were electrified. We were truly “in the presence of greatness.”

Authenticity is Contagious and Powerful

There is one more observation I’d like to share with you about General Moore that I witnessed on President’s Day. I saw what I can only describe as the “magic” of this man. As he spoke about the importance of young people to our future, he was bold at the lectern. As he described his sadness about the blood of his soldiers on his hands, he showed the soft side of the warrior.

When he presented Army Chief of Staff General George W. Casey, Jr., and Casey’s father, General George W. Casey, Sr., with the National Freedom Award, his smile lit up the room. His love for the Army Chief of Staff, who was like a son to him after the death of his father in Vietnam, was demonstrative, and returned with genuine admiration from the man who now leads our country’s Army. Photos snapped of the two men side by side throughout the day reveal a bond so heartfelt, it lifted all of us who had gathered at the convocation, and infused an easy atmosphere in the press room, where I was helping direct the media crews.

But, here’s what I will never, ever forget for as long as I live: When it was announced that “Liberty Hall,” the venue for the convocation that day, was officially going to be renamed “Lt. General Hal Moore Hall,” we saw the purest, most radiant reaction of honest-to-goodness joy and surprise on our hero’s face. I imagine that everyone there that day feels himself or herself to be a better person for witnessing that moment.

“Suit Up” to Make Your Dreams Come Alive

What else did I learn while in the presence of greatness? Believe every day that your dreams can come true. The event at the American Village Campus introduced me to heroes from all walks of life. I saw the manifestations of the dreams of so many people, like Tom Walker, his staff, and Driver. I saw the joy in a beloved hero’s face as he became the official honorary chair of the American Citizenship Trust at 88 years of age. And, yes, I was there to see it and help with it. I suited up. I lived my dream.

If there is anything I would like you to take away from reading about my amazing experience in Alabama, it’s this: if you decide to follow your dreams, no matter who you are, where you are, or how old you are, the incredible can happen. As Geothe said many, many years ago, “Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it.”

Di Chapman is the Founder and President of Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service; and the Chief Communications Officer for Power Connections Inc. Executive Outplacement and Career Management Services. Her website is http://www.dichapman.com

Get “Outside” Yourself and Open Up the Possibilities!!

May 5, 2010

Springtime is here, and even if your spirits are in a funk because you’re searching for work, there is something to be said for getting outside. I refer often to the importance of exercise, and to the critical act of getting out “on foot” to make sure you know everyone and everything in your neighborhood. We Americans can be very good at moving about our daily routines at the speed of light, missing the who, what, why and how of the goings-on in our own neck of the woods. There is value in getting to know the neighbors, the businesses around you, and the conditions and concerns that affect your town. But this message is about much more than that.

It’s important, yes, to always be broadening your personal sphere of knowledge and influence. And you know what? It doesn’t stop there. Julie LaCroix, MA, CMP and I put our heads together recently, and agreed that there are definite ways that an executive in transition can make a powerful statement to the community, and even the world, by taking on a cause, or participating in an inspirational event. Seriously, the adage about how 90% of success is “just showing up” doesn’t just relate to job sites. It also relates to your personal involvement with your community.

Your willingness to be present at the activities of others, particularly others who are striving to do great things with the little they have, or under less than advantageous circumstances,  makes an enormous statement about who you are inside. Likewise, your willingness to give of yourself and your resources, no matter how small a contribution you can make, says volumes about your character. They’re demonstrations of “the stuff you’re made of” and will not go unnoticed.

If you’re stumped about where and how you might contribute to your community while you get outside yourself, literally and figuratively, I’d like to give you some brief examples of things that have appeared on my own personal radar in the last few weeks:

Unless you live in a cave, you have probably heard of The Boston Marathon. It’s never been something that has had great meaning to me, other than my obvious respect for anyone who is able to participate in such an event. (How DO they do that?) But, interestingly enough, it has touched my life in a couple of unexpected ways. First, my sister-in-law was the first woman to enter the Boston Marathon. (I know!! Can you believe there was a time in 20th century history when it was thought that women and girls were incapable of such physical feats?) Then, just a few weeks ago, a dear friend of mine, a world-class athlete who was paralyzed while training in 2001, completed the event – coming in 2nd place among the 24 female hand-cyclists who qualified. Beth Sanden literally bypassed her paralyzed legs, and with an emotional and mental strength that can move mountains, and a heart with the fortitude of a giant, used her arms to propel herself to the finish line.

Beth has always been a hero and a role model in her community, with a thriving personal training business in San Clemente, and a global player as an athlete. But, when she was thrown from a bicycle while taking a curve on a training run in 2001, her spine was shattered. All of us who know her well, remember her months in the hospital, the beginning of her journey back to “life” and her intention to be present in the lives of her two teenage daughters at the time. She had lost her ability to run her business, to use her legs, and to attend to the daily tasks of motherhood, at least for a period of time. Talk about losing one’s sense of self – Beth knew she had to reinvent herself if she was going to be the mother, wife, girlfriend and contributor to the community she always believed she would be.

Slowly, methodically, and painfully, Beth dove back into life. She went from a wheelchair to a tripod cane, then to a regular cane. She began to swim laps daily, using buoys on her legs. She became an active member of the Challenged Athletes Foundation (CAF), a group of individuals who have been paralyzed or suffered loss of limbs, but just keep on going, reinventing themselves as champions, all the while raising money for other victims of accidents who need wheelchairs or financial assistance. In 2006, Beth completed her first triathlon in five years atop a new CAF handcycle. She kept going, and going and going …. and then, she made history, at 55 years of age, in the 114th Boston Marathon. It gives me goosebumps. And if you ask her how she did it, she will tell you she has tremendous faith, and she wants to give back. In every photo you see of Beth, she is with her fellow athletes at CAF, and her smile ignites the scene.

The second thing that got me thinking about how our lives can make an impact on others, and get us “outside ourselves” was when Judy McCoy, a woman who shares one of my evening fitness classes, approached me about helping her promote her nonprofit group’s fundraiser that was held on May 1st. Judy knew that I guest host a radio show (www.bettertimesafterfifty.com) and wondered if I could arrange an on-air mention about the event. Judy’s group is called Ordinary Women, Inc., and they support orphans in Kenya. They are dedicated to placing orphans in local Kenyan families, and providing food, education, and medical care to each child. It was one more reminder to me that there is a whole world of magnanimous activity that goes on in our communities, creating heros among us. We just have to step outside of ourselves and look around to find it.

Getting back to Julie LaCroix, a Career Management Consultant at Power Connections Inc. Julie assists executives in transition every day.  “Sometimes you  gotta do what you gotta do,” she says.  And at the top of the list is taking part-time, temporary, or volunteer work to stay in top form.  “Show your skills, but most importantly, show YOU,” Julie advises.

Start with your attitude and build from there.  First, show these organizations who you are and what you are like to work with.  Then show them your skills.  “You have nothing to lose, so go out on a limb!” Julie exclaims, “Surround yourself with interesting people who can get to know you through working with you. And while you’re at it, do something great for the world!”

Perhaps your efforts won’t lead you directly to an interview or a job, but look at it this way: the relationships you build will most likely bring referrals, and your pro bono work counts as consulting. With the right attitude, you will succeed at communicating your brand, keep your skills sharp, build new relationships, look like a consultant, and generate valuable references and referrals.  Do what you “gotta do”!

Besides, there are people out there who need you, your energy and your talents. I’ve named just a couple of them above. There are so many more. What are you waiting for? Get going!

Di Chapman, President, Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service (www.dichapman.com) and Chief Communications Officer, Power Connections Inc. Career Management and Executive Outplacement Service (www.powerconnectionsinc.com)

Attitudes That Transcend Platitudes

April 16, 2010

The Enormous Potential of an Uncertain Future

“When nothing is sure, everything is possible.” – Margaret Drabble

Oh, my goodness. You’ve just made it through tax time… and to top it off, perhaps you’re “in transition” looking for work, or in a job situation that needs to change. Maybe it’s time to pay school tuition, or pick a college. You might be dealing with a health or family issue that is draining your “reserves” of energy, time, and resources. Given one, two, or ALL of the above, it’s perfectly normal to feel stressed, possibly depressed, or absolutely overwhelmed. And, honestly? Platitudes are probably the LAST thing you want to hear.

I understand. But, one thing life has taught me with absolute certainty is that every day holds the potential to create the life you wish to have. Again and again, timeless wisdom tells us that the potential of an uncertain day, an uncertain future, an uncertain circumstance, is unlocked by an attitude of expectation. Every day offers new moments, new hours, and new opportunities that can be full of expectation for a new you – and it starts with attitude.

But don’t take my word for it. History is full of wisdom from those who have gone before us, giving us quotations like the one above. When you need a “shot in the arm” to keep looking for work, or inspiration to “keep your eyes on the ball,” or the mental fortitude to “get up and get going” another day, try to consider the proposition that there is often truth in the platitudes that swirl around us. I’ll take that a step further, and tell you that there is also fruit to bear that goes beyond the direct advice they give…. The platitudes about attitudes are just the beginning. You know, The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. And there is always more than one road to your future, or as Lt. General Hal Moore says, “There is always one more thing you can do to influence the situation in your favor.”

As an entrepreneur for most of my adult life, I am a firm believer in the power of expectation. I meet each day with the anticipation that it will bear fruit – whether my time is booked with clients – or not. I expect to make a living each day, and I take it a day at a time. Funny how a “freelance writing and media production” business that started out by taking it one day at a time, hitting the pavement, shaking hands, introducing myself wherever I was, and whenever I could, blazed a trail to … now, over 20 years later. Did I travel in a straight line from “zero to making a living?” Did I create everything I dreamed I would have in the form of stuff? Hardly. So far, my life has dealt me a very trying hand, losing two brothers and both parents at a very young age, having a tumor removed, watching my husband lose his job in this recession, investing in a business that failed, and dealing with a malicious identity theft, just to give you a few examples of some of my own challenges along the way.

I’m acutely aware of how immobilized the events of a lifetime can make you feel, no matter what your age or circumstances. I’ve experienced it myself, and I’ve seen it hundreds of times in others. So, for just a few moments, I’m asking you to suspend your doubts and disbeliefs about the possibilities for good that await you today. I’d like you to withhold your skepticism as you read this, and muster your courage to imagine that your future can hold even a fragment of the dreams you have. Just for now, hear me out. Read on to see some of the ways that I “reset my attitude” on a regular basis. For me, it’s about delivering quality service and products in my business, creating daily happiness, and plain old survival. For you, it could be about something else. Just for now, in this moment, consider a few tips and actions that can make a difference in your life:

  • Set out to give a slice of joy to someone today. Notice I said a “slice.” You don’t have to bite off more than you can chew. Perhaps for you it means a “whisper,” a compliment, a “thank you,” a phone call, an E-mail, or a wildflower. Acknowledge and accept the perspectives of others. We’re all doing the best we can right now, in the “shoes” of our circumstances. If need be, set your ego aside for just one moment and reach out to others; “put yourself in their shoes.” There is something you can offer someone you know or love that won’t cost you a thing. And you know what? It can give you and them the possibility of a new outlook, or infuse your lives with a little optimism. This simple act alone can take your attitudes beyond platitudes.
  • Get out on foot. Take a walk, and say “hello” to everyone you meet along the way. Notice everything, and marvel in the characteristics of your neck of the woods. Is there something you can do to help your neighborhood? Do you know the neighbors around you? Do you know their habits and routines? Admire their canine companions and their efforts to exercise. We Americans have become way too sedentary, and that lack of motion in our lives affects us in more ways than one, physically and mentally. There is a whole world out there, right in your own neighborhood, your own town, and your own city. You won’t see it or experience it any other way but on foot. Taking a walk will clear your head, make you healthy, and introduce you to new friends and new ideas for charting a course to a more healthy and vibrant life.
  • Do your routine tasks in a different way. We are the habits we do every day. Deliberately changing one thing daily can change everything. You’ve heard the platitude “You are what you eat.” Take this to heart literally AND figuratively. Your daily routine keeps you in the place you are NOW. Take a look around you and catch a glimpse of yourself in a mirror. Your daily routine has created the images you see. When you learn something new, your brain physiologically changes. When you alter your diet and exercise habits, you reshape your waistline. When you make an effort to listen to someone else’s story, you expand your beliefs and your tolerances. When you take a new route to the market, or venture into a new one altogether, you see things you’ve never seen before. When you visit a coffee shop that’s off your beaten path, you meet new people. When you make new choices, you create a new future.
  • YOU are the architect of your life. There is a famous quotation that is often mistakenly said, “Circumstances make the man.” The actual quotation by James Allen is “Circumstances don’t make the man, they reveal him.” Who you are is attributable in large part to how you have responded to your circumstances. I grew up in a home where my parents loudly opined about all of the politics of our country. As a young adult, I mimicked their words and attitudes boisterously as well. Then one day, with the emergence of a new issue that I felt strongly about, I realized that I could change my opinions if I wanted to. A light bulb literally went off in my head. “Wow. I don’t agree with my parents on this issue. In fact, I don’t agree with their politics at all anymore.” I gave myself permission to change my beliefs in mid-stream, and I’ve never looked back. At my core, I ceased to be the person I was at a young age, and I have taken responsibility for that ever since. My actions reflect who I am.
  • Let yourself EVOLVE with the transformation of a new decision. Make the decision to trust that your life will bring forth a new bounty. You CAN be different than you are now. As human beings it is hard-wired within us to fear the unknown, and to be terrified of change. But, as much as our fears give us comfort because they are what we know, they also bind us tightly, and can imprison us with self-doubt and inaction.

Simple changes in your attitude and routine can affect literally everything about you and bring on a new job, a new relationship, a new outlook, new horizons, new friends, and a new body, just to name a few of the potential benefits. If you take it one day at a time, you can move beyond the platitude “Today is the first day of the rest of your life,” and create today, tomorrow, and ultimately your future, what it stands for, and your legacy. I don’t know about you, but to me, that’s something worth thinking about.

Di Chapman is founder of Words To Your Advantage, a speaking and writing service; and the Chief Communications Officer for Power Connections Inc., an executive career management and outplacement company. Her website is www.dichapman.com.

“The Girls All Get Prettier At Closing Time”

March 22, 2010

No offense, but this line from the country western song says it better than any beautifully crafted phrase. It’s bad enough that you’re on the street, pounding the pavement again after a lifetime of executive achievement, constant promotion, and picking and choosing between “cherry” offers. Your entire career flowed uninterrupted  as it paved an impressive trajectory right into … now. And, honestly? You need to face it. The year 2010 could be the year when you get a job offer that is “less than perfect” than what you had in mind.

Look, I know this totally sucks. Truth be told, if you are one of the elite FEW in this world who are independently wealthy; if you can be comfortably retired due to careful financial planning throughout your working years; or if you have just decided “To heck with it, I’m dropping out of this rat race,” perhaps you can just sit this one out. But, if you’re reading this column, chances are you need to work to support yourself and your family. And that means you might just want to consider offers you would have laughed at before 2008, 2009, or 2010.

So, perhaps the primer below will help you adjust your perspective on the jobs you consider before you dismiss any that don’t “fit” into the neat little package that you call “your career.” In almost everything we do in life, there is almost always more than one way to achieve a desired end. Your job hunt is no exception. This is not the time to stubbornly turn down flat job offers. If you’re having a hard time right now believing this, perhaps some talking points might help you adopt a new attitude and a new plan:

  • Did you get an offer that is not what your idea of a “future” was? Not the right company name you had planned to put on your resume? Not the image you had in mind? Let’s be straight about this. Tell yourself it’s time to take a new perspective on the number of ways you can accomplish a goal and move toward your future.
  • Get over yourself! The events surrounding your job loss and subsequent search for your next opportunity are not all about you. No sir. No ma’am. Your job hunt is about you, your family, your community, your peers, and your contributions to all of them; and theirs to you. Sometimes, you gotta do what you gotta do to remain a member of the team and get back in the game. So, get over it! Moping, isolating, or snapping at those you love is extremely unproductive, so start anew each day and with each interview. If you get an offer, look at the glass as half full. Then, figure out a way to completely fill it.
  • Set your ego aside. No matter with whom you interview or for what, your unemployed status is not someone else’s problem. So, act politely and graciously toward every interview and every offer. You’re not a gang member or schoolyard bully. No arrogance or cynicism, or criticism is allowed of anyone you meet during the interview process. Act like a grown-up and mind your manners.
  • Listen to advice from those you know well. If you’re a displaced senior management executive, this one can be very tough, but friends, peers, and even family members might be able to point out some things about job offers that will help you make your decision.
  • Consider ALL offers. Show genuine appreciation and thanks to everyone who interviews you or meets you for coffee during this period of your life. You’re in good company right now. Believe it or not, we’re all doing the best we can, and hoping for the best for our future, even the one who’s interviewing you for a job. We’re all in this together.

Once you’re back in the swing of a new job, your entire picture will change. Your esteem and confidence will pick back up. More importantly, you’ll once again be sitting at the lunch table with the guys who are employed, and there is tremendous power in that.

For now, remember that the only thing truly certain in life is that things will change, no matter who you are. Terrifying as that may seem at a time like this, it also holds great promise. Taking an offer for a job that might not be the one of your dreams is not necessarily the end of the road. It could be a portal to a future that holds more than you ever imagined.

Diane Y. Chapman, Founder and President, Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service; and Chief Communications Officer, Power Connections Career Management, Coaching and Transitions Service

Success is Never Final

March 15, 2010

We welcome an expert Career Coach with this TDJH Tip Tactic post, and are delighted that she has chosen to publish her valuable advice with us here at The Daily Job Hunt. Julie LaCroix, M.A. Ed., CMP, has been following along with The Daily Job Hunt twitter tips since the beginning of the year, and has sent me feedback and wisdom that I’d like to start sharing with you. We’ll start with her comments about how being “in transition,” i.e., unemployed but looking, is an excellent time to do some soul-searching and a reality check. Here are Julie’s thoughts:

Do you really think this is the last time you will be faced with being in transition?

This transition is not your last, so make the most of it. Use this transition as an opportunity to do the hard work to create a differentiation platform for yourself now, so you have something to build on next time.

Once you dive deep into your experiences to pull out your passions and expertise, you have defined your brand. In hunting for your next job, be sure you are positioning yourself to build on those. Make this work count. Make sure you can build on what you already know and love and are good at. Look for roles in organizations that will enhance the brand you have developed. Here are some ideas:

– In the transition process, have you learned that you are really good at working with large sets of data? Then be sure you are developing expertise in your new job that enhances the use of technology.

– In the transition process, you have realized that you don’t really like to manage people? Look for a job that allows you to manage processes instead.

– Are you an IT project leader with a combined skillset of aggressive project management, yet a collaborative leadership style? Look for a CEO who is looking for rapid change, but will allow you to manage the project autonomously.

Keeping your expertise in mind, your next job can help even further develop your brand.

Develop your brand now. Build on it during your next job. Have a powerful branding message ready to launch for your next transition; you may have developed a strong and successful brand for yourself, but it won’t be your final one.

Julie LaCroix, M.A. Ed., CMP, Career Management Consultant and Coach, Power Connections Executive Career Management and Outplacement Services

Stories From “The Hunt:” It’s a Whole New World!

March 7, 2010

We’re getting great feedback here at TheDailyJobHunt, and I love it! It’s great to hear from all of you about your own personal stories, trials, and victories. In addition to your experiences and views, we’ll also soon be publishing Tip Tactics for the Hunt, actions you can put to work right away as you decide which TDJH strategies to incorporate into your own personal job hunt. Don’t forget you can sign up to receive TheDailyJobHunt Tips via Twitter at http://www.Twitter.com/InspirationalDi. You’ll receive a quick tip and/or shot of inspiration every day of the year!

Today’s guest blog is by R.L. Lloyd, who might be just like YOU – a daily job hunter!

March 4, 2010

As an “Executive in Transition,” I am currently reassessing my career goals.  Having been employed consistently for over twenty-five years, this is a new and traumatic experience for me! Not only have I changed dramatically, the method of job hunting (a euphemism for “what the heck do I do now?”) has morphed into something almost unrecognizable.

The last time I “looked for work” I picked up a newspaper and browsed the want ads.  I also contacted an employment agency and interviewed for a position to fit my skills. I submitted a résumé that listed my employment history and waited for an interview with the head of human resources or a corporate officer, i.e., a real person. Today? Well, imagine my naiveté.  While I realized many things had changed, I was totally unprepared for exactly how much had changed!

I won’t belabor the “changes” at this time; anyone looking for work after even five years of consistent employment knows what they are.  For me, the most radical change was The Résumé.

While potential employers still require a résumé, the format and method of submission are quite different. Many companies will only accept a resume’ via email.  The résumé is then “searched” for key words to determine if the candidate qualifies for the position, before it even reaches a human being!  So, if not “worded” correctly, your résumé’ isn’t even considered.

Also, my experience now is that one résumé may not be enough.  Depending on your career goals and experience, you may need to feature different skills and qualities for each position you are interested in.  I actually have four specific résumés now, each one tweaked to highlight different experience.

I began with just one, stating the obvious, based on my last position and title.  But as I updated all of my achievements and the depth of my professional history, it became apparent that I had a lot more experience in more areas than I realized.  It also became apparent that I might be able to change careers based on this experience, and be qualified for several different “jobs!”

This opened up a whole new world for me!  I did not have to be “pigeon holed” into an environment that no longer fit. I could still grow, continue to learn and be productive in ways I had never seriously considered before!  There was finally a “light at the end of the tunnel,” and instead of the headlight of an oncoming freight train barreling down at me, it was the opening to a whole new vista! A future that held endless possibilities, goals and “work” that I could really “get into” and enjoy!

Now, tethering my balloon for a minute, I have to honestly say, the prospect was daunting.  But at least it was a “prospect.”  And if my résumés were any proof, I was more than capable of pursuing these career options.

Therefore, I cannot stress enough how vital a good resume is!  Not only will it attract the right opportunity, but the process will open your eyes to just how talented you really are!  I don’t know about you, but for me, this “eye opener” has been a blessing.  Being “downsized” isn’t good for anyone’s morale, and it had left me personally feeling totally “dispensable. “

But, with my “new and improved” résumé versions in tow, I am now on my way to that “bright future” previously described. I am effectively changing my career, following new options, and feeling more “indispensable” than ever!  And, I am “slowly but surely” adapting to the changes required by today’s job market.  After all, I can hardly let that highly qualified, skilled person described in my résumé down, now can I?

So, Job Hunters everywhere, take heed – grab your “new and improved” résumé and get going! Success awaits!

– R.L. Lloyd

Thank you, R.L., for sharing your personal story with TheDailyJobHunt !! – Di Chapman, Founder, Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service; Chief Writer and Communications Officer for PowerConnectionsInc.com

Make Each Day Amazing!

February 26, 2010

Note to Self:  Start Now!

What are you waiting for?

‘Til you find another job? And then what? ‘Til you get a day off? And then what? ‘Til you get the garage cleaned out? Or the roses pruned? Or the living room painted?

Didn’t the last five years of your life go by in a flash? What about the last ten? I snapped my fingers, and they’re GONE. I still have piles of files full of ideas that I thought I’d pursue….. dreams that I just knew I’d bring to fruition. Places I’d visit, and museums I’d wander through, soaking up the history and the knowledge. Books I thought I’d read while lounging next to the pool or in the park. Movies I’d catch to give myself pure unadulterated “down time.”

Yet, here I am, ten years later, looking at the stack. The stack of dreams, of ideas to pitch, of interests to follow, of causes to contribute to, of books to write, and products to create, things to sell, and talents to learn. Where did the time go? Where did the moments of my life go? And where did I go?

When I ponder philosophically about life in this column, I mean to do so in the rhetorical sense. Personally, I try not to sink too deeply into any form of gut-wrenching assessment about the meaning of life. I have way too much to do! So, my musings are meant to be about the collective “we,” and hopefully, you can buy into what I have to say, and apply it to your own life. (Or even more fun, use what I have to say to tell someone else how to live their life!)

My point is this. Whenever we’re unemployed, we beat ourselves up unmercifully about how we can’t do anything BUT keep our nose to the grindstone about “looking for work.” I say that in quotations, because in our culture, “looking for work” is supposedly done in only one manner, and in a prescribed format that “they” say we have to do. And, after we do what “they” say we must do to find a job, and we start working again, we can then start over once more with looking for a life; as long as the life we’re looking for doesn’t interfere with our job. Or so they say. Well, what if that doesn’t have to be true? And who are “they,” anyway?

Might it just be possible that if you go looking for “a life” each day, you might find a job? Think about it. You could get up, eat your cereal, go on Craig’s List and Monster, scan the job listings for hours, make a sandwich, go on The Ladders, scan the job listings, send out a few resumes, and call it a day. And, maybe, the next day, you could get up, eat your cereal, get dressed in professional attire, go to a “job lead swap meet,” go home, hit the computer, and start all over again. That’s the usually prescribed method for “finding a job” while putting your life on hold.

What if you try something different? What if you make a point each day to have a LIFE, and in the process, look for opportunities for work? What if you get up and eat your cereal, then take a walk, and say “hello” to everyone you meet along the way? If you see someone who is fixing a bicycle tire by the side of the road, stop to help. If you meet a pet owner walking the dog, stop to scratch the tail wagger behind the ears. With a hike behind you, stop to visit the most happening coffee shop in the neighborhood where you want to work. While you’re there, why don’t you notice who else is there? And when you get your coffee refill, why don’t you give a genuine compliment to the servers, who by the way, are employed doing what they can to create a LIFE as well!

Then, later, when you take your own pooch or kitty to the vet or the groomer, take a moment to really get to know the office staff. They’re just trying to create a LIFE as well. Notice what they do for you and how they pamper your precious furry one.  Compliment their dedication and customer service and attitudes. Why not make their day?

And don’t let it stop there! Look around you. Every day there are myriad ways you can change your life for the better, and change others’ lives for the better, and create an amazing day. Understand what I’m saying here – “amazing” can be created in big ways and small – and it doesn’t have to be something that falls out of the sky. You have the ability to create something out of the ordinary every day – something that could lead to a job possibility. Something amazing! Every time you step outside of yourself, and interact with others, and show genuine interest in them, and pursue your passions, and visit daily destinations, as well as out of the way locations, it doesn’t matter where or how – you can create something amazing. And that something can lead to a job.

I mentioned in my last post about how sometimes you gotta take a leap of faith. I used an example of going out of your way to meet or correspond with a person you admire, no matter who they are. I’m not talking about stalking. I’m talking about reaching out to everyone you meet to find a common ground with that someone you have always wanted to know…. and for a genuinely productive reason. Why not make a pact with yourself that if you’re ever able to connect with someone you admire, you’ll do what it takes to make it happen? Why not make a pact with yourself that you will walk a path that will take you to a place to honor them, or to acknowledge their effect on your life?

The trick is, and here’s the important part – wherever you go, there YOU are. Learn to savor every moment, every person, every clerk, every task as you go through your days. If you’re not working yet, it will make each day more bearable. And, who knows? The “amazing” could happen. The smiling face behind the coffee counter might just be the child or parent of someone who can offer you a job. Are you having difficulty taking a reality check? Do you have too much ego in the way? Don’t think the grocery checker or counter help can influence whether or not YOU can find a job? Think again. The CEO of your dream company might just make a daily stop in your favorite coffee shop, unbeknownst to you. The poodle being groomed next to your schnauzer could be a beloved member of the family of the Chairman of your most admired corporation.

Look, we spend our entire lives working so that someday, we can have a life. When we don’t have a job, we tend to spend our days living like we can’t have a life. Turn it upside down on its head. Vow to make each non-working, job-hunting day full of interaction and serendipity. It could be just the approach you need to create the next “first day” of the rest of your life.

And, I’ve got news for you. Whether you think you can or think you can’t have a life today, you have one. Why not make it amazing?

Sincerely,

Di Chapman, Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service and Chief Writer and Communications Officer, Power Connections Executive Career Management, Coaching and Outplacement Service

You Gotta JUMP!!

February 10, 2010

Sometimes, in life, you gotta take a leap of faith.

I know this is true, as I have probably taken more than my fair share of “leaps,” often jumping into things that were not quite right, including a few jobs. BUT HERE’S THE DEAL: When you’re looking for work, the tendency is to stand at the edge of the cliff, peeking over the rim beneath you, and freezing your focus on nothing but the sheer drop before you.  Now, honestly, I’m terrified of heights …. I have no idea when that came about. When I was a kid I scaled buildings and walked logs that had fallen across canyons, and jumped off of high dives – all in the company of my older brothers. I hung off of treeforts, and climbed high fir trees, limb to limb. It was exhilarating to me!!

But, somewhere along the way, between childhood and “grown up,” I lost some of my ability to leap into the unknown or climb high, whether it was a networking event, a possible job opportunity, or even making calls to people I’ve always wanted to meet. Somewhere, somehow, I began to experience FEAR of the unknown.

Which brings me to NOW. In this past year, I took a leap of faith. I mustered my courage to make some phone calls, and to send some emails to amazing people I truly wanted to make sure I meet in my lifetime. I gently persisted, always polite, always genuine in my calls and emails, expressing how much I admire them and their work.

Now, exactly one year later, my writing is being posted regularly on http://www.simpletruths.com/blog. Such an honorable and impressive online publisher. AND that connection, started by my emails to Mac Anderson, the CEO and Founder, and his staff, has now led to something I could not have imagined in my wildest dreams ….. I’m helping the team of Lt. Gen. Hal Moore, one of the most celebrated heroes of the Vietnam war, as he presents the National Freedom Award to the Army Chief of Staff, Gen. George W. Casey, Jr., and posthumously, Maj. Gen. George W. Casey, Sr, who lost his life in Vietnam. The event is scheduled for February 15th, President’s Day, and I’LL BE THERE.

My gentle, persistent phone calls and E-mails to the General’s staff over the last 8 to 10 months resulted in the invitation to join his speech-writing and publicity team. It’s such an honor, and I hope to represent the General Moore team to the best of my abilities. Ladies and Gentleman, I suited up!

You can suit up for the role of your dreams as well. Be inspired!! And while you’re here, I’ve attached the press release we’ve written for this incredible event honoring true American heroes, the genuine articles. I’d love it if you’d pass along this information to everyone you know: You, I, WE need a hero right now…. and this amazing event will give us three of them.

…. and YOU need to know that if you’re willing to take a leap, amazing things can come from it. Sometimes, it’s the perfect thing to do!

Sincerely, Di Chapman, Founder of Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service, and Chief Writer and Communications Officer for Power Connections  – Please see President’s Day info below:

For Immediate Release

Montevallo, Alabama:

ARMY CHIEF OF STAFFGENERAL GEORGE W. CASEY, JR.

AND LATE MAJOR GENERALGEORGE W. CASEY, SR.

TO RECEIVE NATIONAL FREEDOM AWARD

PRESENTED BY THE AMERICAN CITIZENSHIP TRUST WITH LT. GEN. HAL MOORE

United States Army Chief of Staff, General George W. Casey, Jr., will personally receive and accept for his deceased father, Major General George W. Casey, Sr., the National Freedom Award from the American Citizenship Trust on President’s Day, February 15, 2010.  Previous recipient, Lt. General Hal Moore, and West Point (’45) classmate of Casey, Sr., will present the award along with the American Citizenship Trust.

The President’s Day Convocation and Celebration is being hosted at the American Village campus of the American Citizenship Trust in Montevallo, Alabama. The All-American lineup and other key program highlights include:

Secretary Dirk Kempthorne (former Secretary of the Interior, U.S. Senator and Governor of Idaho) will speak on LAND OF THE FREE

Secretary Bo Calloway (former Secretary of the Army) will share his views on HOME OF THE BRAVE

The keynote address will be delivered by Lt. General Hal Moore – ONE HEARTBEAT: A SACRED FIRE FOR AMERICA’S LIBERTY.

BACKGROUND: The National Freedom Award

The National Freedom Award is awarded by the American Citizenship Trust to those who have rendered great service to America as a citizen, leader and steward.  From George Washington forward, America has benefited from leaders who have distinguished themselves in service to our nation above self and personal glory.

Lt. General Hal Moore

The first recipient was a military hero, author, and speaker on leadership, Lt. General Hal Moore.  A book authored by Hal Moore and Joe Galloway, We Were Soldiers Once… And Young, remained in the #1 spot on the New York Times Best Seller List for seventeen weeks and soon thereafter was adapted to the motion picture screen in a film called, We Were Soldiers.

The movie featured Mel Gibson as Moore, Sam Elliott as Sgt. Major Basil Plumley, Madeleine Stowe as Julie Moore, and Barry Pippen as Joe Galloway.  Greg Kinnear portrayed Bruce “Snake” Crandall, a courageous helicopter pilot.  In addition to the events for which Hal Moore would gain fame, the book and movie also chronicle the heroic exploits of Col. Bruce Crandall, Col. Joe Marm, and Ed “Too Tall” Freeman, all of whom would be awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for actions in the battle of Ia Drang Valley.

For Moore, it will be an honor to present, along with the American Citizenship Trust, the National Freedom Award to Moore’s former West Point classmate (Class of 1945) and dear friend, Major General George W. Casey, Sr., and his son, Army Chief of Staff General George W. Casey, Jr.

Moore’s and Casey’s careers paralleled each other, both serving in the heat of battle in Korea and Vietnam, but the two were to meet very different fates.  On July 7, 1970, Casey’s helicopter crashed into a mountain in bad weather and he was killed.  He was the highest-ranking member of the armed forces to be killed in Vietnam.

Moore said of Casey recently, “He should never have been killed.  It should have been me.  America needed him more than me.” Nevertheless, in the years following Casey’s death, Moore celebrated the great service of his friend and classmate.

Major General George W. Casey, Sr.

Casey’s service included commanding of the 1st Cavalry Division (United States).  Casey’s decorations and medals were many:  Silver Star (3), Legion of Merit (2), Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, Purple Heart (2), and the Air Medal.  His wife, three daughters and two sons, including George Jr., who was 22 at the time his father was killed, survived Major General Casey.  Immediately after his father’s death, Julie and Hal Moore were constant friends and supporters of the family during their time of grief.

General George W. Casey, Jr., Army Chief of Staff

General George W. Casey, Jr., learned many lessons from his father’s years of service. He would come to know and embrace courage, sacrifice and care of the soldier.  General George Casey now is leading the U.S. Army as Chief of Staff.  Gen. Casey has held commands of the Multinational Force Iraq, 1st Armored Division, Joint Warfighting Center, and the 3rd Brigade 1st Cavalry Division.  He has received the following medals and awards:  Defense Distinguished Service Medal (3), Army Distinguished Service Medal (2), Legion of Merit (3), and the Defense Meritorious Service Medal. Casey has served as Chief of Staff of the US ARMY since April 10, 2007.

The immense privilege to honor the Casey family leadership legacy, which General Casey, Jr. builds upon in serving America today, is of the highest order.

ABOUT THE EVENT

The event honors five hundred invited guests and celebrate there being citizens and leaders in and for America.  Included are leaders from America in education, government, military, business, civic affairs, religion, and entertainment.

The American Citizenship Trust is awarding the 2010 National Freedom Award jointly to General George W. Casey, Jr., United States Army Chief of Staff, and his father, Major General George W. Casey, Sr., who was killed in Vietnam in 1970. The joint award to a son and father is unique and recognizes the significant contributions by two great Americans, whose names are each synonymous with leadership, courage and sacrifice.

The American Citizenship Trust hosts this event at its signature campus — the American Village —  located just south of Birmingham, right in the center of Alabama and the Southeastern United States.  This occasion celebrates the 10th anniversary of the American Village campus.  Over 35,000 students from throughout the Southeastern United States participate each year in its citizenship and leadership educational programs.  For ten years, it has served as a powerful, major hands-on learning center for students to experience the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, and the Bill of Rights – first hand.  Students debate Patrick Henry’s resolves for independence, meet Thomas Jefferson as he drafts the Declaration, drill in Washington’s Army, serve as delegates to the Constitutional Convention, and meet in a full replica of the President’s Oval Office.

The American Village is located on a 113-acre campus unique in America, with its primary goal to teach citizenship and leadership to America’s youth.  Over 400,000 youth have been part of the revolutionary experience of 1776.  There is something about American Village from the past that inspires youth to believe in for the future.  President’s Day, February 15, 2010 will offer a window into the next decade, for the year 2020.  Tom Walker will respond to the challenge from Lt. General Hal Moore by outlining the Trust’s national education plans for the next decade.

The Addresses: The Land of the Free /The Home of the Brave /One Heartbeat

As a tribute to America on President’s Day, the five hundred invited guests will be treated to three important keynote addresses.  The day will feature Secretary Dirk Kempthorne in his presentation of Land of the Free.  Kempthorne was mayor of Boise, Idaho, Governor of Idaho, US Senator from Idaho and former Secretary of the Interior.  Kempthorne states,“The privilege I have is to have been invited to Liberty Hall as a citizen of the United States of America.  I am truly humbled to be included.  It will be a day to be remembered forevermore, and to able to share thoughts on America’s freedom is a gift to me.”

Former Secretary of the Army, Bo Callaway, will speak on America, The Home of the Brave.  Calloway was secretary during the Hal Moore years and awarded him his third star.  Callaway is most expressive in his feelings, “Since the beginning, America has offered the most courageous and brave military in the world.  Our men and women are unequalled in might and devotion to country.  To speak about their bravery in this setting will be an undeserved honor.”

The last keynote address is One Heartbeat: A Sacred Fire for America’s Liberty, to be given by Lt. General Hal Moore.  “George Washington had that sacred fire. So must I. So must we. So must our youth.  It is high time we come together to blaze new trails for America’s liberty.”

The response For Liberty! will be given by American Citizenship Trust founder and chief executive officer Tom Walker.  “Benjamin Franklin said our founders had given to us a Republic, if we can keep it.  George Washington said liberty was an ‘experiment’ in the hands of the American people.  The question today for America is, ‘how shall we keep the Republic,’ and ‘how shall we keep faith with the vision of our founders and those who in every generation have sacrificed for liberty?'” The addresses will be presented under the American Citizenship Trust program theme:  Citizens, Leaders, Stewards.

Happy 88th Birthday Hal Moore

Later, festivities include Hal Moore’s 88th birthday celebration, including a country music presentation and an Alabama country style Bar-B-Q luncheon and special remarks from Joe Galloway, and Joe Marm, Medal of Honor recipient.  Songs written and recorded for Hal Moore and his wife Julie, now deceased, include Julie I’m Home, The Ballard of Hal Moore, A Mighty Chill, and Lady Liberty.

About the day’s activities and the National Freedom Award, Tom Walker frames the events by saying, “This day is what George Washington and Abraham Lincoln envisioned for America – a day devoted to liberty and love of our nation.  We as American citizens and leaders bare responsibility for what Washington called the ‘sacred fire of liberty’ — and that is what brings us together this President’s Day, and will inspire us long after.  We honor these servants of liberty and country and look forward to this remarkable day.”

Any media requests must be made approved in advance.

Press kits available, with photos and bios.

For additional information contact:

US Army Chief of Staff PR:  LTC Rich Spiegel (703-693-4961) EST

Alabama PR and Media:  Mike Jones – 205-665-3535 ext. 25 CST

National PR and Media:

Di Chapman – 949-275-8188, PST

Brian Sobel – 707-762-3509, PST