Posts Tagged ‘Jobs’

Jobs: where they are now

May 31, 2013

Today’s job market is changing geographically and metaphorically, and current job seekers must keep their eyes on the literally shifting sands of opportunities. For the first time in a generation, gains in jobs are happening now within industries that might surprise you, and in locations that might have been declared “dead and done” in the last period of growth of our economy.

If there is one word to describe what’s happening in this country and where the jobs are, it’s change. Silicon Valley is once again booming with the success of companies like Instagram, Salesforce.com, Yelp, LinkedIn and Twitter joining Google, Yahoo, Cisco, Facebook and YouTube. Wired magazine, in its May 2013 edition, reports that Silicon Valley continues to produce the most spectacular companies of our era, this time no longer in danger of a bust. A plus side in finding employment there is the general salary range, which tends to average $90 to $100K per year, as opposed to $50K throughout the country.

The June 2011 issue of Wired Magazine dedicated a large section of its pages to delivering the employment -related facts and figures that emerged from 2006 to 2010. There are jobs out there, and some of them are growing swiftly, but they may not be in the places we used to find them. The good news is, if you’ve got your game on, these industries, according to Wired, grew at a pretty good clip.

Wired asked Linked In to analyze the 7 million US members who had switched jobs since 2006 and present the industries to which they had gone. The results? The “renewables and environment” industry grew enormously since 2006, a whopping 56.8%; and jobs involving the Internet grew 29.8%. Jobs in the wireless industry grew 21.4% from 2006 to 2010. Employment in the computer industry and network security grew 21.8%.

But Silicon Valley jobs are not the only growing ones. Jobs in online publishing grew 29.1%. The professional training industry grew 13.9%. The E-learning industry grew 18.7%, and graphic design grew by 7.8%.

If you’re in the business of computer games, information services or biotechnology, your field grew by 11.1%,  8%, and 12.8% respectively.

“Old-fashioned industries” are being transformed as well, with oil and energy up 7.3%. Jobs in that industry are driven by exploration in North Dakota and Louisiana, and are attracting thousands of unemployed Americans. Railroad manufacturing is up 9.4%, and medical device manufacturing up 12.5%. Time magazine reports that farming income was up 27% in 2011.

As a testament to the “old fashioned” trend, an April 24, 2013 Forbes online article by Jacqueline Smith  listed the “Ten Happiest Cities For Young Professionals” which surprisingly included Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Riverside, California; Chicago, Illinois; Houston, Texas and Phoenix, Arizona. These seasoned cities ranked alongside the more commonly cited San Diego and San Jose. Their resurrection is driving jobs.

The employment picture in the U.S. reflects major changes in the industries that are hiring, and where the opportunities lie. Smart job seekers are polishing their resumes accordingly, and hitting the road.

Di Chapman is Chief Communications Officer of Power Connections, Inc., and a speaker/writer. Her book How Smart People Sabotage Their Job Search was coauthored with Susan Howington, and is available on Amazon.com. She can be read at http://www.Examiner.com, CBS Local Atlanta Online, and http://www.thecurrentplus.com. Her LinkedIn profile is www.linkedin.com/in/DiChapman.

Seven reasons boomers are successful in their “next act”

May 24, 2013

Robert N. Butler, M.D., a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and founder of the International Longevity Center-U.S.A., had much to say about how boomers view the contributions they can make to their communities, country and the globe. The stereotypes of us declining in our work and productivity are finally starting to change, all because we have embraced youthfulness and  new goals.

Many boomers are not looking at work as something that ends as they age. As they leave traditional “9 to 5” positions, they are starting and succeeding in businesses throughout America. Here’s why.

We know our purpose and passion.

Starting a “next act” can be our way of following our purpose and passion.

For most boomers, freedom from childbearing and raising children, along with the wisdom gained from decades of working to make ends meet, and the soul-searching of growing older have given us a firm grasp on what we see as important in life. We know what we love to do, and how we prefer to do it. We know what we want, and, more importantly, what we don’t want.

Frank Mack, founder of City Antiques in Roswell, Georgia loves running his independent family business out of a 15,000 square foot retail space, with a 3000 square foot warehouse. Everyone knows he has a passion for finding furniture, antiquities and antique books. “I love  recycling, re-purposing and re-loving antique finds for use once again. I left the corporate environment and found my next act in this creative business.”

Vikie Barbos, 60, founder and CEO of the three “Tuscan” assisted living homes in Fountain Hills and Scottsdale, Arizona, found her perfect purpose in eldercare.

When families bring an aging relative to her homes, they are invariably shellshocked from caretaking, and the seniors themselves wonder what their futures hold. “They look at me and ask, ‘Do you really think you can help me?’ I promise them I will give the help they need, no matter what time of day or night.”

We know the meaning of value and value-added.

We’re savvy, educated consumers and professionals who demand value in our own lives and want it for our clients. We’ve negotiated and purchased multiple homes, cars, furnishings and kids’ educations. We know value when we see it.

Susan Howington, 55, started Power Connections Executive Coaching, Leadership and Outplacement Service when she was in her own transitional period. At 55, she brings to the country a new paradigm in helping professionals in job search and career management.

The most valuable service she and her team renders is about making connections. “It’s how most jobs are found. That’s definitely our value-add.”

Power Connections provides individually customized person-to person programs. “We want to see and get to know each person, and start tailoring their search process wherever they are,” she says.

In addition, Howington and her team help working and nonworking professionals define their brands and manage their careers through workshops and globally recognized tools such as Harrison Assessment Talent Solutions products.

We’re redefining “youthful.”

We’re younger than ever in energy and spirit. Don’t let the grey hair and increasing facial lines fool you. We enjoy working with young people, and love hearing their hopes and dreams. We often move to healthier cities and towns where we can pursue outdoor activities, lured by communities with walking paths, biking paths and overpasses for busy streets. We’re invading exercise classes in droves.

Eileen Disken, founder of Smart Bodies Fitness in Fountain Hills, Arizona, retired from the New Jersey public school system in 1998 at age 53, with a plan for her next act. Moving cross-country, she set up a personal training business in the desert. She had already achieved the women’s world record for her 24-hour ultra-marathon win in the South Jersey Roadrunners’ race in 1978, and had run the Boston Marathon. In 1973 she competed as the first woman in the Penn Relay Marathon. She started body building in her early 50s.

With abundant energy and a genuine interest in helping others achieve optimum fitness, her motto is “Age is a state of mind.” She gained her clients through word of mouth. Now, 15 years later, at nearly 68, she has 50, most of them successful entrepreneurs, and many of them over 50 themselves.

Vikie Barbos’ business never tires her out. “I’m required to be active and available 24/7, knowing we might need to issue a 911 call. I’m the one who interacts with medical teams for all of my residents.

We’re also a generation who embraces plastic surgery to align our outsides with the youthfulness we feel on the inside. The demand for arm lifts, eye lifts, jowl lifts and liposuction is higher than ever, for both men and women.

We are genuine and authentic in our relationships.

The years of keeping up with the Joneses are over.  We know who we are. The relationships we build with clients, investors and vendors are infused with honest intentions to treat them respectfully.

Frank Mack’s clients, vendors and associates are loyal to a “t” as they know he is always supportive of them. His storefront and knowledge are avenues for their own successes. He rents out cubical-like spaces to independent antique enthusiasts who wish to sell products with no leases or city licenses needed. “I’m breaking even after three years in business because I’m surrounded by people who love what they do. We have a ‘main street’ atmosphere in the store, with incredible relationships, and service for the hundreds of customers who shop with us.”

Howington says reputation is everything in building Power Connections. “Our relationships with business leaders and organizations are critical to our success in providing valuable connections to our clients,” she says.

“In eldercare you must have good relationships with your workers, hospitals, home health agencies, hospices and family doctors. It’s the only way to succeed,” says Barbos. “You also must have great relationships with residents’ families.”

Happiness is our first priority.

More than fame, fortune, expensive homes and cars, we value our happiness and the happiness of those around us.

Howington points out that her business success is all about helping clients create the happiness of finding a new job or career path. “Their exhilaration and renewed anticipation about their future is what defines our happiness here as well.”

Barbos is an immigrant from Romania, used to having extended family living under the same roof. She currently cares for her mother at home. She established her assisted living homes as beautiful living spaces for her residents. “I want to create happiness for them, helping them all enjoy each day. I have never treated them like they are old. We keep them active and social.”

For Mack, the happiness his growing venture provides him is unfolding as he creates the largest collection of antique books and medical antiquities in Georgia. “I have found the secret to happiness and success right here. I’m surrounded by amazing finds. I no longer need the biggest house on the block, or the fanciest car. I’m living my dream.”

We know first hand the search for meaning.

We want to make a positive impact on our families, communities and the world. We don’t want to “die with our music still in us,” to quote Oliver Wendell Holmes. We’re willing to keep working  for as long as it takes to do it.

Disken plans to keep training “to whenever.” She cultivates her own fitness daily with runs and hikes. She is a churchgoer and participates in a Mastermind group. “I am always open to means to self-improvement,” she says. “It keeps you fresh and focused on the good in life.”

Barbos is fulfilled with caretaking and a business full of meaning. “Many people don’t understand eldercare. You learn so much from seniors. They all bring something special to others.”

“I make a comfortable living,” she explains, “and I put most of my earnings back into the homes. I have put two kids through college, and now my daughter works with me to manage the Fountain Hills residence. I am so happy she finds meaning in the eldercare as well.”

We know our clients’ priorities.

Disken’s days usually start before the crack of dawn with client trainings at 5 a.m., and often end at 6:30 p.m. Her clients need to fit in exercise before and after work. “I have to meet them whenever they’re available,” she says. “They are busy people.”

She asks them to pursue fitness as a priority in their lives, and tells them, “There are no excuses for not pursuing health as a top priority throughout life. My goal is to instill in them a love of exercise and what it contributes to overall well-being.”

Howington adds that her clients’ number one priority is creating a better life through their next career move, or maximizing their current job situation. Her motto to them is “Outplacement Excellence. Custom Approach. Individualized Attention. Every time.”

To even suggest that aging is equivalent to slowing down is to ignore baby boomer employment trends and the number who are creating their “next act” by starting businesses. Boomers are becoming one of the world’s largest demographic groups, and if they have their way, they’ll be one of the most successful populations in history as well.

Di Chapman is the coauthor of “How Smart People Sabotage Their Job Search” on Amazon, and a business and health writer who writes for CBS Local Atlanta, Examner.com, numerous blogs and private clients. She has written four books and countless articles for publication.

Where the Jobs Are! The Shifting Sands of Opportunities

September 13, 2011

If you don’t read anything else about the job market this year, you MUST read this. And I mean ALL of you, whether you are unemployed and seeking work, or gainfully employed and sitting back because you think your situation won’t change.

The job market sands are shifting metaphorically and geographically. You might be surprised at where the gains in jobs are happening right now – and I mean the industries where growth is actually happening. With all the loud, heated public vitriol about the employment picture in this country, constructive reports about growing industries are few and far between. But, I found one – and it’s a good-sized report that will hopefully give you a boost, or at least a “road map” to help you navigate the future.

It’s time to make the decision to keep your eyes on the shifting sands of opportunities. And by the word “sands,” I mean the metaphorical job market shifts; and literally, the geography of where jobs are headed inside the United States. Depending on your own personal circumstances, this information may surprise and delight you; or drop on you like a bomb. Nonetheless, it’s important for you to know.

If you’re currently employed, you probably exhibit the tendency to put your head in the – ahem! – sand – about shifting job market factors. Humans seem to have an aversion to smartly gathering up protective information about things when they don’t believe that something will happen to them. I know of many people, and perhaps you do as well, who, instead of dusting off their resumes because there are rumors of changes throughout their organizations, prefer to sit back and say, “I’ll wait to see what happens.” As a resume writer since 1990, I cannot tell you how many individuals I have worked with over the years who frantically called to come in for a resume composition at the very last possible moment of needing one.

If there is ONE word to describe what’s happening in this country and where the jobs are, it’s CHANGE. Yeah, I said it. Change. No doubt, if you’re like everyone else, this is the last thing you want. I encourage you, though, to look at the information I’ve compiled, and enthusiastically assess how it affects you, your career and your life. As difficult as change may be, it holds the potential to be the best thing that ever happens to you! Honest!

Where the jobs are – the top growing industries, and how their jobs are changing.

The June 2011 issue of Wired Magazine dedicated a large section of its pages to delivering the jobs-related facts and figures that have now emerged in the rubble of the financial catastrophe around us. There are jobs out there, and some of them are growing swiftly, but they may not be in the places we used to find them. The good news is, if you’ve got your game on, these industries, according to Wired, grew at a pretty good clip from 2006 to 2010. Amen to that! Here is a summary of the list, with some percentages attached to the growing industries:

I won’t beat around the bush on the good news. Wired asked Linked In to analyze the 7 million US members who had switched jobs since 2006 and present the industries to which they had gone. The results? The “renewables and environment” industry grew enormously since 2006, a whopping 56.8%; as well as jobs involving the Internet, which grew 29.8%. Jobs in the wireless industry grew 21.4% from 2006 to 2010 – no surprise there. Jobs in the computer industry and network security grew 21.8%.

Now for a few stats that might surprise you. Jobs in online publishing grew 29.1% since 2006. The professional training industry grew 13.9%. Railroad manufacture grew 9.4% and medical device manufacturing grew 12.5%. The E-learning industry grew 18.7% (we saw that coming), and graphic designers saw their field grow by 7.8%. Who knew?

If you’re in the business of computer games, oil and energy, information services or biotechnology, your field grew by 11.1%, 7.3%, 8%, and 12.8% respectively. But wait! Time magazine reports that Farming income – farming income – was up 27% last year and is still rising. Farming is expected to grow another 20% this year.

The most amazing thing, though, according to Wired, is how the jobs themselves have morphed since 2006. “Old-fashioned industries” are being transformed, with the lines between blue and white collar positions becoming blurred, and educational requirements evolving in ways that are more horizontal than vertical. The hopeful result in all of the shifting trends in job creation is that our country’s middle class will once again start to emerge strong and healthy. This is good news for all of us. Change is happening.

My next segment on The Daily Job Hunt is part two of this report on Where the Jobs Are! Although some of you will claim it’s the other shoe dropping, I think it’s fascinating information that could hold promise for millions of people. Perhaps for you it will put the wheels in motion to a new, promising life. Buckle up and get ready!

Diane Y. (Di) Chapman is the Founder and President of Words To Your Advantage Speaking and Writing Service, and the Chief Communications Officer of Power Connections Executive Outplacement and Leadership Coaching Service. Connect with Di at http://www.LinkedIn.com/in/DiChapman and follow her at http://www.twitter.com/InspirationalDi